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Watch Kristin’s Talk: Serious Fun

For Grades K – 8

Are you frustrated trying to teach school in a traditional way at home? Do your students have difficulty focusing and sitting still? Do you dread school time?

What Did My Son Enjoy?

Very early on I also became frustrated with homeschooling. I wanted homeschooling to be fun. I wanted to enjoy it. So with much enthusiasm and a startling dose of fear I asked myself two questions: What did my son enjoy? And what was easy and enjoyable for me? The answer was books. Real books, not the dry, unimaginative textbooks that come with sets of curriculum, but fun books from the library or bookstore that were written to engage, inspire and entertain children. Though he wouldn’t sit for workbooks, coloring books or sometimes even meals, my son would sit and listen me read 5 or 6 books in a row. So this is where I began.

Real Books…and Lots of Them

The following is a list of books (over 1,500, including some games and dvds) that I used for Kindergarten through 8th grade and that I highly recommend. I have chosen only the best and have organized them in what, I hope, is an accessible way. They represent hundreds of hours of research on my part, and thousands of hours of writing and drawing on the part of the authors and illustrators whose works are represented here.

Preface to the Second Edition

I have produced a second edition so soon after the first for a couple of reasons. The first edition was rather hurried and unplanned, in preparation for a talk I gave at the local charter school. It sort of grew into a book by accident as I gathered together the stacks of materials I had used with my son over the years and listed them on my laptop sitting in front of the fire on Sunday afternoons during the weekly football games. As I rushed it to the printers I was aware that several sections were sparse at best, and when I received the first box of books (on the day of the meeting — whew!) I became painfully aware that though I remembered to include a table of contents, I’d forgotten page numbers.

This edition remedies many of those problems. I have filled out some of the sparse sections (particularly modern history) and added over 400 titles in all. These include not only books, but games, puzzles, videos and music. I went back and listed new titles by authors who have continued to publish since my son and I enjoyed their work several years ago. I tightened up the format, fixed some glaring typos and, of course, remembered to add the page numbers. Although it could never be considered exhaustive (though it certainly has been exhausting) it is now, I hope, a more thorough and easy-to-use reference that will allow you to maximize and enjoy your homeschool time with your children.

Kristin J. Draeger
August 6, 2013

Sample Pages

HTML text (machine readable) for the following images can be found below.


Readable content from the images above

  • Preface to the Second Edition 5
  • Introduction 6
  • Real Math Books 11
  • Math Books for K-3rd Grades 11
  • Math Books for 4th-8th Grades 20
  • Real Science Books 27
  • Science Books for K-3rd Grades 27
  • Science Books for 4th-8th Grades 45
  • Real History Books 63
  • History Books for K-3rd Grades 63
  • History Books for 4th-8th Grades 73
  • Real Geography Books 99
  • Geography Books for K-3rd Grades 99
  • Geography Books for 4th-8th Grades 105
  • Real Literature Books 113
  • Literature Books for K-3rd Grades 113
  • Literature Books for 4th-8th Grades 116
  • Real Grammar Books 123
  • Grammar Books for K-3rd Grades 123
  • Grammar Books for 4th-8th Grades 126
  • Real Art History Books 133
  • Art History Books for K-3rd Grades 133
  • Art History Books for 4th-8th Grades 135

Introduction

Are you frustrated trying to teach school in a traditional way at home? Do your students have difficulty focusing and sitting still? Do you dread school time? Very early on I also became frustrated with homeschooling. I wanted homeschooling to be fun. I wanted to enjoy it. I didn’t want it to be another thing like room-cleaning and teeth-brushing that I had to nag and force my child to do. This seemed wrong and antithetical to the whole idea of spending quality time together.

In addition, my son had some extra issues. He was not the type of 5-year-old who would sit at the table for 15 or 20 (or 5!) minutes at a time and print his abc’s or write his numbers or even color a picture. Nor did he have any interest (or ability) in learning to read or write at an early age (He finally began reading at 8 and writing at 10 — it turns out he was/is highly dyslexic). And all the time in the background homeschool gurus insist that literacy is primary and absolutely essential in these early years – everything depends upon it, they say.

On top of it all I was convalescing from a ten-year illness and teaching art history to 60 students per week so I didn’t have a lot of time or energy to spend preparing creative lesson plans. So I was faced with a choice. We could fight our way through the early years with traditional curriculum and hope for a modicum of success (and hope our relationship survived it) or I could throw it all out the window and try something new.

So with much enthusiasm and a startling dose of fear I asked myself two questions: What did my son enjoy? And what was easy and enjoyable for me? The answer was books. Real books, not the dry, unimaginative textbooks that come with sets of curriculum, but fun books from the library or bookstore that were written to engage, inspire and entertain children. Though he wouldn’t sit for workbooks, coloring books or sometimes even meals, my son would sit and listen me read 5 or 6 books in a row. So this is where I began.

Over the next few years I scoured the library and Amazon.com for kids’ books that are both entertaining and educational, and what I found amazed me. I now have hundreds of fun books on science, history, literature, grammar and math (yes, math!). For the next four years (K-3rd) my son’s education consisted mainly of reading books. Every day we would pull a science, history, literature, grammar and math book off the shelf and go sit down and I would read them to him. It felt like cheating. It felt wrong, but ultimately it felt great. We totally enjoyed it and we both looked forward to it (Yes, we did occasionally do some math and attempted reading, but it was sporadic. It was the exception, not the rule.).

The big question is, of course, did it work? And with a heavy sigh of relief I can say yes. Today he is in 9th grade and fits in just fine. He even gets high test scores and straight A’s in his classes. I don’t say this to brag, but to let you know that homeschooling can be done differently. It can be enjoyable and academic and easy.

The next question would then be, how did I do it? This is what a typical day looked like for my son and I when he was in the early (K-3rd) grades. At the beginning of our day I would pull a book from each of the subjects; that means I’d have a stack of six or seven picture books. Then we would go sit outside, or by the fire and read two or three books, take a break for a snack, laundry or errands and then read two or three more, take a break for more housework, and then finish the stack. While I did housework, cooked or prepared for the classes I taught, he might watch a Magic School Bus, or Bill Nye the Science Guy video (our day always included an educational video). I also tried to include a math game or geography puzzle. The skip-count math songs and science songs we kept in the car and would pop them in whenever we went somewhere. All-in-all, it was a bit haphazard, but it worked for us. Most importantly my son enjoyed the experience immensely. In fact, looking back he says that until he began the 4th grade he didn’t know he was doing school at all.

This isn’t to say that during kindergarten through third grade he never picked up a pencil. We did attempt some math worksheets and some printing, but not every day and not more than 10-15 minutes at a time. We did a lot of verbal math. He would jump on the bed and chant his addition tables, or bounce a ball or throw bean bags, anything that burned energy while we memorized.

Even as a five-year-old he began listening to chapter books. I would read about 30 minutes at a time and he would sit on the floor and put LEGOs together. Don’t underestimate a child’s ability to multi-task. My husband and I both at first doubted that he could truly listen and absorb the story AND build a flame-throwing, four-wheeled, turbo-boosted, whatcha-macallit, but he proved over and over that he could. At 5 I read Mary Pope Osborne’s Odyssey series and at 8 my husband read the Lord of the Rings trilogy to him (among many other titles). Many times we assumed that he was more engrossed in the LEGOs than the reading material, then we would come to a funny part in the story and he would burst out laughing, or ask a pertinent question at the right time. He was definitely paying attention.

By the time he was in the fourth grade I decided we should begin a math curriculum. At this point he could add and subtract, carry and borrow, and multiply two or three digit numbers, but that was all. He’d never done a full workbook or math text. In retrospect I would say if you could work four or five problems a day on paper from about 1st or 2nd grade on it would be ideal, but our experience was less organized.

Fourth grade marked a significant change in the way we organized our day. I wanted to keep reading the books that we loved, but we also had to add time for math and writing. At this point I joined with my sister and together we schooled my son and her two boys together. We divided the day into times and subjects and split the teaching of them between us.

Each day we spent 90 minutes doing math. The first 20-25 minutes I would read to them from one or more of the math books. The next 45 minutes they would work on their math curriculum and the final 20-25 minutes we would play a math game.

For the writing part of their day, fourth and fifth grades was almost exclusively journal writing. We depended on a book called Unjournaling by Cheryl Miler Thurston for writing prompts. The boys (10, 10 and 13) loved writing in their journals so they could read their entries to each other when they were finished. At this point the competition (often to see who could write the most bizarre, silly or gross entry) was essential. Why else would a 10-year-old boy write than to gross out his friends?

For grammar, my sister taught using the Easy Grammar series and would spend half the time reading grammar books to them and half the time working on the grammar worksheets.

A key element in his 4th-8th grade years was phonics tutoring. Though he was already becoming a proficient reader, at 10 my son couldn’t write or spell at all and we had him tested for dyslexia and he scored rather high (high is bad, not good here). My sister’s older son is also dyslexic and she began tutoring them both 30-60 minutes per day using Susan Barton’s phonics program. Slowly over the next four years his writing and spelling improved nearly up to grade level.

During the 4th-8th grade years we still taught literature, science and history entirely by reading real books. At this point the boys still built LEGOs while we read, but they would also color maps, sit on those giant Pilate’s balls (this is a must-have if you have boys), juggle, play with clay, yo-yo, or lie on the floor and stare into space. The only thing we required was silence.

All-in-all I was quite confident that using real books exclusively for literature, science and history wouldn’t be a problem. I was more concerned about writing and math. As I said earlier, at 10 years of age my son couldn’t write much more than his name and address with any confidence. In the fourth and fifth grades he began writing short journal entries. By sixth grade my sister had him doing short IEW (Institute for Excellence in Writing) lessons and in the seventh grade we practiced essays. In the eighth grade I signed him up with a local teacher who teaches homeschool literature/writing classes out of her home and he began writing literature analysis essays on Shakespeare, Steinbeck and Hawthorne. The first semester of his eighth grade year he read 5 novels and finished 5 essays and received A’s on all of them. My relief was palpable.

As far as math was concerned, in the fourth grade he began with Math-U-See’s long division book. In the fifth grade we tackled fractions, in sixth grade percents and decimals, and seventh pre-algebra. In the eighth we began algebra and at the semester break he tried a local public charter school for the rest of eighth grade. I was nervous that he wouldn’t be able to keep up in math with such a lean background, but he jumped into the algebra class and earned A’s for the entire semester. All semester I waited for the other shoe to drop, so to speak, but it never did. After finals in May I finally let the breath out that I was holding and congratulated him on a great year.

He earned A’s in all his other subjects as well, and I would like to report that he went on to high school and never looked back, but that was not the case. Though he was making amazing marks in his eighth grade public school experiment, he was not enjoying it. The school was a small local high school with a nurturing atmosphere. The teachers were kind and helpful and the student body was easy going. They boasted some of the highest test scores in the state, and called themselves a university-model school. Classes met twice a week and students we’re responsible for homework on their off-days just like in college. But the core of the curriculum was textbooks and worksheets. He worked hard to get his A’s, but he was bored. During the semester my husband and I saw his love of learning and his enthusiasm fall dramatically. So at the end of the year we pulled him out and this year we are back to homeschooling with more real books.

All this is to say that even during the later years, although math and writing need to be taught, it is still possible to rely heavily on real books. My son tolerated math and writing better as he got older, but still loved listening to and reading real books. The following is a list of books that I used and that I highly recommend. I have chosen only the best and have organized them in what, I hope, is an accessible way. They represent hundreds of hours of research on my part, and thousands of hours of writing and drawing on the part of the authors and illustrators whose works are represented here.

Enjoy.

Kristin J. Draeger
seriousfunk12.com
artk12.com
info@artk12.com


Math Books for K-3rd Grades

General Math Books (K-3rd Grades)

  • Allen, Nancy Kelly. Once Upon a Dime: A Math Adventure.
  • Anno, Masaichiro. Anno’s Counting Book.
  • Anno, Masaichiro. Anno’s Counting House.
  • Anno, Masaichiro. Anno’s Magic Seeds.
  • Anno, Masaichiro. Anno’s Math Games.
  • Anno, Masaichiro. Anno’s Mysterious Multiplying Jar.
  • Birch, David. The King’s Chessboard.
  • D’Agnese, Joseph. Blockhead: The Life of Fibonacci.
  • Demi. One Grain Of Rice: A Mathematical Folktale. Scholastic Press, 1997.
  • Dodds, Dayle Ann. Full House: An Invitation to Fractions. Publishing, 2008.
  • Duke, Kate. One Guinea Pig is Not Enough. Puffin, 2001.
  • Duke, Kate. Twenty is Too Many. Dutton Juvenile, 2000.
  • Einhorn, Edward. Once Upon a Dime: A Math Adventure. Charlesbridge Publishing, 1999.
  • Einhorn, Edward. A Very Improbable Story: A Math Adventure.
  • Ellis, Julie. What’s Your Angle, Pythagoras? A Math Adventure.
  • Ellis, Julie. Pythagoras and the Ratios: A Math Adventure.
  • Fisher, Doris. One Odd Day. Sylvan Dell Publishing, 2007.
  • Fisher, Doris. My Even Day. Sylvan Dell Publishing, 2007.
  • Fisher, Doris. My Half Day. Sylvan Dell Publishing, 2008.
  • Ghigna, Charles. One Hundred Shoes: A Math Reader.
  • Gravett, Emily. The Rabbit Problem.
  • Harris, Trudy. Pattern Fish.
  • Harris, Trudy. Pattern Bugs.
  • Heiligman, Deborah. The Boy Who Loved Math: The Improbable Life of Paul Erdos.
  • Holub, Joan. Zero the Hero. Henry Holt and Co., 2012.
  • Hulme, Joy N. Sea Squares.
  • Hulme, Joy N. Sea Sums.
  • Hulme, Joy N. Wild Fibonacci. Tricycle Press, 2010.
  • Pinczes, Elinor J. One Hundred Hungry Ants. Sandpiper, 1999.
  • Kroll, Virginia. Equal Shmequal. Charlesbridge Pub Inc., 2005.
  • Leedy, Loreen. Measuring Penny. Square Fish, 2000.
  • Leedy, Loreen. Follow the Money! Holiday House, 2003.
  • Leedy, Loreen. The Great Graph Contest. Holiday House, 1999.
  • Leedy, Loreen. Mission: Addition. Holiday House, 2003.
  • Leedy, Loreen. 2 X 2 = Boo: A Set of Spooky Multiplication Stories.
  • Leedy, Loreen. It’s Probably Penny. Square Fish, 2000.

Math Books for 4th-8th Grades

General Math Books (4th-8th Grades)

  • Abbott, Edwin A. Flatland.
  • Calvert, Pam. Multiplying Menace: The Revenge Of Rumpelstiltskin.
  • Calvert, Pam. The Multiplying Menace Divides. Charlesbridge Pub Inc., 2011.
  • Ekeland, Ivar. The Cat in Numberland.
  • Enzensberger, Hans Magnus. The Number Devil: A Mathematical Adventure.
  • Glass, Julie. A Fly on the Ceiling (Step-Into-Reading, Step 4).
  • Murphy, Frank. Ben Franklin and the Magic Squares (Step-Into-Reading, Step 4).
  • Packard, Edward. Big Numbers.
  • Packard, Edward. Little Numbers.
  • Pappas, Theoni. The Adventures of Penrose the Mathematical Cat.
  • Pappas, Theoni. Further Adventures of Penrose the Mathematical Cat.
  • Peterson, Ivars. Math Trek: Adventures in the Math Zone.
  • Reimer, Luetta. Mathematicians Are People Too: Stories from the Lives of Great Mathematicians, Vol. 1.
  • Reimer, Luetta. Mathematicians Are People Too: Stories from the Lives of Great Mathematicians, Vol. 2.
  • Rosenthal, Amy Krouse Rosenthal. Wumbers. Chronicle Books, 2012.
  • Schwartz, David M. G Is for Googol: A Math Alphabet Book.
  • Schwartz, David M. How Much Is a Million? HarperCollins, 2004.
  • Schwartz, David M. If You Made a Million. HarperCollins, 1994.
  • Schwartz, David M. Millions to Measure. HarperCollins, 2006.
  • Schwartz, David M. On Beyond a Million: An Amazing Math Journey. Dragonfly Books, 2001.
  • Sleator, William. The Boy Who Reversed Himself.
  • Sundby, Scott. Cut Down to Size at High Noon: A Math Adventure.
  • Tahan, Malba. The Man Who Counted: A Collection of Mathematical Adventures.

Series of Math Books (4th-8th Grades)

Murderous Maths
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. Awesome Arithmetricks (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. Desperate Measures (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. Do You Feel Lucky? (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. Easy Questions Evil Answers (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. The Fiendish Angletron (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. Guaranteed to Bend Your Brain (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. Guaranteed to Mash Your Mind (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. Key to the Universe (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. The Mean and Vulgar Bits (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. The Perfect Sausage (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. Phantom X (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. Savage Shapes (Murderous Maths).
  • Poskitt, Kjartan. The Secret Life of Codes (Murderous Maths).

  • Branley, Franklyn M. The Planets in Our Solar System (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science, Stage 2). HarperCollins, 2004.
  • Branley, Frank M. The Sky Is Full of Stars (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1983
  • Branley, Franklyn M. The Sun: Our Nearest Star (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out). HarperCollins, 2002.
  • Branley, Franklyn M. Sunshine Makes the Seasons (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2005.
  • Branley, Franklyn M. Tornado Alert (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1990.
  • Branley, Franklyn M. Volcanoes (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2008.
  • Branley, Frank M. What the Moon is Like (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science, Stage 2). HarperCollins, 2000.
  • Branley, Franklyn M. What Happened to the Dinosaurs? (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1991.
  • Branley, Franklyn M. What Makes Day and Night (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1986.
  • Branley, Franklyn M. What Makes a Magnet? (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1996.
  • DeWitt, Lynda. What Will the Weather Be? (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2004.
  • Dorros, Arthur. Ant Cities (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1988.
  • Dorros, Arthur. Feel the Wind (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1990.
  • Dorros, Arthur. Follow the Water from Brook to Ocean (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1993.
  • Duke, Kate. Archaeologists Dig for Clues (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1996.
  • Earle, Ann. Zipping, Zapping, Zooming Bats (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1995.
  • Gans, Roma. How Do Birds Find Their Way? (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1996.
  • Gans, Roma. Let’s Go Rock Collecting (Let’S-Read-And-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1997.
  • Hodgkins, Fran. How People Learned to Fly (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2007.
  • Lauber, Patricia. An Octopus Is Amazing (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1996.
  • Lauber, Patricia. Snakes Are Hunters (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1989.
  • Lauber, Patricia. Who Eats What? Food Chains and Food Webs (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1994.
  • Maestro, Betsy. How Do Apples Grow? (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1993.
  • Maestro, Betsy. Why Do Leaves Change Color? (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1994.
  • Otto, Carolyn B. What Color Is Camouflage? (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1996.
  • Pfeffer, Wendy. Dolphin Talk: Whistles, Clicks, and Clapping Jaws (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science, Stage 2). HarperCollins, 2003.
  • Pfeffer, Wendy. Life in a Coral Reef (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2004.
  • Pfeffer, Wendy. Wiggling Worms at Work (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2003.
  • Showers, Paul. A Drop of Blood (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2004.
  • Showers, Paul. Hear Your Heart (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2000.
  • Showers, Paul. What Happens to a Hamburger? (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2001.
  • Showers, Paul. Where Does the Garbage Go? (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1994.
  • Showers, Paul. Your Skin and Mine: Revised Edition (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1991.
  • Tatham, Betty. Penguin Chick (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2001.
  • Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weldner. Did Dinosaurs Have Feathers? (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2003.
  • Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weldner. Dinosaur Tracks (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2007.
  • Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weldner. How Mountains Are Made (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1995.
  • Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weidner. What Is the World Made Of? All About Solids, Liquids, and Gases (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 1998.
  • Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weldner. Where Did Dinosaurs Come From? (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2). HarperCollins, 2010.

Real History Books

History Books for K-3rd Grades

General History Books (K-3rd Grades)

Ancient History (K-3rd Grades)
  • Bailey, Linda. Adventures in Ancient China (Good Times Travel Agency). ISBN 1550745484
  • Bailey, Linda. Adventures in Ancient Egypt (Good Times Travel Agency). ISBN 1550745484
  • Bailey, Linda. Adventures in Ancient Greece (Good Times Travel Agency). ISBN 1550745360
  • Bailey, Linda. Adventures in the Ice Age (Good Times Travel Agency). ISBN 1553375041
  • Brett, Jan. The First Dog. ISBN 0152276513
  • Cole, Joanna. Ms. Frizzle’s Adventures: Ancient Egypt. ISBN
  • Dubowski, Mark. Discovery in the Cave (Step into Reading).
  • Dubowski, Mark. Ice Mummy (Step into Reading).
  • Gauch, Sarah. Voyage to the Pharos.
  • Greenburg, J.C. In the Ice Age (Andrew Lost #12).
  • Lasky, Kathryn. The Librarian Who Measured the Earth.
  • McCully, Emily Arnold. The Secret Cave: Discovering Lascaux.
  • Morley, Jacqueline. You Wouldn’t Want to Work on the Great Wall of China! Defenses You’d Rather not Build.
  • O’Connor, Jane. Hidden Army: Clay soldiers of Ancient China (All Aboard Reading).
  • Osborne, Mary Pope. Day Of The Dragon-King (Magic Tree House 14). ISBN 0679890513
  • Osborne, Mary Pope. Hour of the Olympics (Magic Tree House No. 16). ISBN 0679890629
  • Osborne, Mary Pope. Mummies in the Morning (Magic Tree House, No. 3).
  • Osborne, Mary Pope. Sunset of the Sabertooth. ISBN 0679863737
  • Osborne, Mary Pope. Vacation Under the Volcano (Magic Tree House, No. 13).
  • Pilegard, Virginia. The Emperor’s Army: A Mathematical Adventure.
  • Platt, Richard. Roman Diary: The Journal of Iliona of Mytilini: Captured and Sold as a Slave in Rome – AD 107.
  • Scieszka, Jon. It’s All Greek to Me #8 (Time Warp Trio).
  • Scieszka, Jon. See You Later, Gladiator #9 (Time Warp Trio).
  • Scieszka, Jon. Tut, Tut #6 (Time Warp Trio).